When Do Rottweilers Stop Growing?

When do Rottweilers stop growing? The breed, officially classified as large-sized, is an imposing figure. When does its height achieve its full potential?

Pet height is a rather important factor for a homeowner. It will determine the living space they can provide for their pet within their household. It is important to be aware of just how big our beloved puppies will get when they grow up so that we can be prepared for this change.

Figuring out your Rottweiler’s growth spurt will help you plan ahead. This will make sure everyone living in your house will be happy and comfortable. Pets need their own space to live and grow – read on to learn more about when Rottweilers would stop growing.

How Tall Is A Rottweiler Puppy?

When you first receive the Rottweiler puppy, it will be a cute creature. It is fun to see how the intimidating dog once started as an adorable little puppy. Their shiny black coat and rust markings are already beautiful, and all that’s left is for the dog to grow in size!

The typical Rottweiler puppy will be as tall as 13 inches or 33 cm. They do grow quite rapidly in their first year. This is when you might find some aggression issues in your Rottweiler too, and may take advantage of its height against humans and other dogs they find suspicious.

Rottweiler Puppy

Read more about: How To Train A Rottweiler Puppy Not To Bite

When Do Rottweilers Stop Growing?

At around 24 months or 2 years of age, your Rottweiler should reach maturity and be at its full height potential.  We can consider this to be the age that you have a fully grown Rottweiler.

However, despite reaching its average height, the weight of the Rottweiler can still change and increase. This change depends on a lot of different factors as well.

Male Rottweiler Average Height

It is established that the male Rottweiler is the brawnier of the two sexes. They typically are able to put on more mass, whether that be muscle or fat. To support all this weight, they are expectedly taller.

According to the American Kennel Club, the male has a height expectancy in the range of 24 to 27 inches or 60.96 to 68.58 cm.

Female Rottweiler Average Height

The female Rottweiler is generally shorter than their male counterparts. They also weigh less, so you might be able to identify a Rottweiler’s sex just with a visual inspection of their body. Despite this, they are still fearsome dogs that have all the good qualities of a Rottweiler breed.

According to the American Kennel Club, the female has a height expectancy in the range of 22 to 25 inches or 55.88 to 63.50 cm.

Are There Miniature Rottweilers?

There are Rottweilers that are smaller than what is typical of the breed. However, it is not a recognized breed, unlike other miniature versions of large dogs. They are not officially registered in any kennel club.

There’s a number of factors that contribute to the small stature of such dogs. First, they are likely to be crossbred. Some mix breeders encourage the mutation for shorter legs in some dogs. This leads to a higher probability of these shorter-legged small dogs. This mutation is called fibroblast growth factor 4 and is also popularly known among the savvy as FGF4.

There is also a dwarfism gene that could be passed down to offspring, leading to bone deformity. It should be noted that these genes and disorders threaten to shorten the lifespan of certain dog breeds and this is a risk that must be acknowledged with their breeding.

Two typical forms are that of osteochondrodysplasia and achondroplasia. Osteochondrodysplasia affects the bone and cartilage. They are not able to grow properly and leads to bone deformities that they grow into adulthood. Achondroplasia, on the other hand, is a specific type of osteochondrodysplasia. It is when the bones are not able to grow to their normal size. This leads to dwarfism, where the limbs are shorter than the expectation.

Read more about: What Is A Miniature Rottweiler Full Grown Like?

How Can I Make Sure My Rottweiler Grows Up Healthy?

Improve Diet

Add bone-forming and strengthening nutrients to the diets of your dogs. This is especially important for Rottweilers that suffer a lot of bone-related diseases.

When training your Rottweilers, whether it’s for obedience or socialization, keep your treats in check. Positive reinforcement is important and effective for the training process. However, many owners tend to go overboard and do not check the quantity and quality of the treats they provide for their dogs. This leads to unnecessary weight gain and can evolve into obesity or other health issues.

Encourage Exercise

Did you know that the Rottweiler has the potential to become a couch potato? Despite being a popular police and attack dog, they are not like the athletic Labradors or Retrievers – they would rather do brain puzzles!

While you might have a Rottweiler that enjoys regular walks and exploring the outdoors, you need to give them much more encouragement to do some daily exercise. Try to keep the exercise light, as rough physical activity can erode their vulnerable joints very rapidly.

Check For Hereditary Diseases

Unfortunately, like in many large-sized dogs, Rottweilers can suffer from a variety of hereditary bone diseases. They are predisposed to a “heritable phenotype” of obesity incidence, too. When such afflictions are in your dog’s genes, suffering might be inevitable. However, this doesn’t mean that you should just sit back and wait.

Be updated on your dog’s vital stats and health concerns. Take them to the veterinarian according to a proper schedule and check for tests and x-rays. You may be able to pre-empt the onset of the disease and help your dog live in comfort and health.

One of the most notable afflictions for Rottweilers is hip dysplasia. This is an unfortunate circumstance in many large dogs and can lead to a lot of pain. While not fatal, the pain can be unbearable. Getting ahead and finding treatment as early as possible can help your pet greatly.

Do you have a Rottweiler since puppyhood? Were you surprised with how tall and heavy your adult Rottweiler came to be? Let us know in the comments!

Read more about: The Oldest Rottweiler On Record

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